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© 2019 Idaho Botanical Garden

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Great Garden Escape – Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio

Thursday, July 01st 2021 • 6:00pm - 9:00pm

We’ve partnered with the folks at Duck Club to bring you another amazing season of Great Garden Escape! Bring your blanket and folding chair to sit and enjoy music in the oasis of the Meditation Garden. Masks are still required while not at your seat, to continue to keep everyone safe.

This week’s GGE features:

🌱  7/1 Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio

Tickets 

$12 – Members
$15 – $20 –Nonmembers
Free – Kiddos 3 and Under

Get your tickets here

 

Gates @ 5 pm
Show from 6 pm – 9 pm

** Tickets are available in advance only and must be purchased online. Tickets will be available to purchase online until sold out, or until the start of the show.

** E-tickets (delivered in a separate e-mail) can be taken straight to the gate to be taken the night of. When purchasing tickets, members receive their discount at the check-out screen once they sign in or register with the online sales program.

Seating is limited in the Meditation Garden. In order to keep guests safe and to maintain social-distancing we encourage you to explore our many acres and spread out into the various garden spaces.

Food & Drink

Visitors are welcome to bring in their own food and non-alcoholic beverages. Lost Grove Brewing will be onsite serving beer, canned cocktails, and canned wine from Split Rail Winery. Tasty bites will be available from Willowcreek!


Delvan Lamarr Organ Trio – 7/1

Soul-jazz groove-machine Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio—or as it is sometimes referred to, DLO3—never would have happened without years and years of crummy gigs, and Delvon’s staunchly supportive wife, Amy Novo. 

The story goes that Hammond b3 organist Delvon would regularly lug his 400-pound instrument from venue to venue barely breaking even to play other people’s music, and Amy just got tired of it. She fiercely believed in Delvon’s talents, and, eventually, she made an offer he couldn’t refuse: If Delvon picked the musicians, she would take care of all the business surrounding it.  

“I was watching an amazing talent being marginalized. He would be getting paid like $75 a gig and be spending $60 in gas to cart around his instrument, sometimes even renting a U-Haul. It wasn’t fair,” says the self-made music mogul who may be the first person to legally own a band. “For years, Amy had been telling me to step out from being a sideman. This was a natural move. Now, I can just play music and not worry—it’s been a welcome relief,” Delvon says. 

***