Posts Tagged: Anna Lindquist

Wed
24
2016

What’s Blooming 8/24/2016

Rocky Mountain Bee Plant – Cleome serrulata

 

Cleome serrulata

At first glance Rocky Mountain bee plant might appear to be an import from an alien planet. The big pink blooms, with long seed capsules dangling down like legs, atop a spindly stalk are unlike many other plants. So why do we have this plant at the Idaho Botanical Garden? Well, despite its otherworldly appearance Rocky Mountain bee plant is a North American native. It can be found growing from British Columbia all the way down to Arizona and New Mexico.

Read the article »



Thu
28
2016

What’s Blooming 7/28/2016

Desert Willow – Chilopsis linearis

 

IMG_1791

The common name for Chilopsis linearis, desert willow, might first appear to be an oxymoron, as we often associate willows with water. However, Chilopsis is only “willow” in name and appearance. True willows are in the genus Salix. Chilopsis, on the other hand, is a monotypic genus – a genus that contains only one species. In this case, that species is Chilopsis linearis.

Read the article »



Tue
12
2016

What’s Blooming 7/12/2016

Purple Prairie Clover – Dalea purpurea

 

FullSizeRender

Throughout the Idaho Botanical Garden you may notice certain plants covered in small metal cages made of chicken wire. Curious visitors often ask what we use these cages for, and the answer is: for protection. It really is a problem we have brought on ourselves. While human members see the staggering variety of plants we have here at the garden as a tapestry to be admired, our resident critters see a veritable smorgasbord of tasty treats. One particularly appetizing plant that needs extra protection is Purple Prairie Clover, Dalea purpurea. Without fortification, this plant would surely have succumbed to our rabbit population years ago, the young shoots being especially desirable for their high protein content. Luckily the clover has become more established over the years, and now appears to be at the point where it is not as appetizing, having woodier, thicker stems, and thus in less need of protection.

Read the article »



Wed
22
2016

What’s Blooming 6/22/2016

Oceanspray – Holodiscus discolor

 

IMG_1444

As we enter the heat of summer, flowers in many parts of the garden are slowly succumbing to the rising temperatures. However, one plant that is flourishing in the Lewis and Clark Native Plant Garden is oceanspray, Holodiscus discolor. A member of the rose family, oceanspray is a northwest perennial shrub that grows 4-5 feet tall with an arching habit. In summer the shrub is covered in green, deeply lobed leaves and sprays of fragrant white flowers. The plentiful, creamy blooms provide a bounty of food for native pollinators. 

Read the article »



Tue
31
2016

What’s Blooming 5/31/2016

Red Hot Poker – Kniphofia uvaria

 

FullSizeRender (9)

The common names of plants can often be misleading or nonsensical. However, looking around town at the blooming Red Hot Poker, also known as Torch Lily, the plant seems suitably named. A native of South Africa, Kniphofia uvaria has quickly become a garden staple throughout the world thanks to its striking blooms, love of heat and sun, and its drought tolerance.

Read the article »