Press Room


Welcome to the Idaho Botanical Garden Press Room. Here you’ll find the latest garden news and links to our social media resources. If you are a member of the media and need assistance, please call Warren Maxfield at 208-343-8649



Wed
20
Jul

What’s Blooming 7/20/2016

Dahlias

 

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Native to Mexico and Central America, dahlias are tuberous rooted perennials in the aster (Asteraceae) family. Years after its discovery, the first dahlia was taken to Europe. Although it adapted well to European soils, it did not dependably survive winters. In the 19th century, botanists in the Netherlands began to experiment, and from a pair of dahlias came the majority of dahlias found for sale today.

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Tue
12
Jul

What’s Blooming 7/12/2016

Purple Prairie Clover – Dalea purpurea

 

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Throughout the Idaho Botanical Garden you may notice certain plants covered in small metal cages made of chicken wire. Curious visitors often ask what we use these cages for, and the answer is: for protection. It really is a problem we have brought on ourselves. While human members see the staggering variety of plants we have here at the garden as a tapestry to be admired, our resident critters see a veritable smorgasbord of tasty treats. One particularly appetizing plant that needs extra protection is Purple Prairie Clover, Dalea purpurea. Without fortification, this plant would surely have succumbed to our rabbit population years ago, the young shoots being especially desirable for their high protein content. Luckily the clover has become more established over the years, and now appears to be at the point where it is not as appetizing, having woodier, thicker stems, and thus in less need of protection.

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Wed
6
Jul

What’s Blooming 7/06/2016

Texas Red Yucca – Hesperaloe parviflora

 

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It may surprise you that a plant native to central Texas and northern Mexico thrives in Idaho, but it’s true. Hesperaloe parviflora has a condensed native range deep in the heart of Texas, where it tolerates extremely high temperatures and very dry soils. When grown in regions where temperatures drop below zero in the winter and snow piles up around it, it tolerates that too. It’s a tough Texas plant.

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